• @amit The problems with ebooks have nothing to do with the format(s), and much more to do with the means that most publishers and retailers have chosen to deliver them to us. That's why all of mine are now PDF files. And I'll buy physical copies when it makes sense - or works out cheaper - to do so.

  • @jack I use Discord for communication, and it's great for that, but a forum replacement it ain't. I can only suppose that those closing down such forums regard dealing with their audience to be Someone Else's Problem.

  • @baldur Ouch, but also very true (alas).

  • @richText And may it continue to do so for many more years. I'm still holding onto my 1st-generation iPhone SE here, it does what I need of it and that's enough for me.

  • @patrickrhone My big bugbear with ebooks is DRM, and being forced to use a specific application to read them. I now have a slimmed-down library of ebooks, all PDF format, consisting of reference material and user manuals. I walked away from my Kindle and Audible libraries last year when I closed down my original Amazon account, but I have no regrets about doing so. I've started buying non-fiction and fiction books in physical form this year, including reference material for my move into copyediting and proofreading.

  • @Miraz Sound choice, I've been supporting them for several years now - solid news and commentary without hyperbole, along with product update reminders. :) @aa

  • @adamprocter What a surprise. Not.

  • @yorrike I hear you, sites that will let you just buy something are still in the minority. I can understand if creating an account means that I can re-download something, but that's pretty much the only good reason. All the other reasons are of marginal value either to myself or the retailer, unless the goal is to sell my information.

  • @renevanbelzen If it's one or two steps per page, then I'd say that's a good thing, as the diagrams will be larger and easier to read.

  • @ton I should do something similar on my blog, thankfully the Broken Links plugin makes it easy to find all the posts where I've linked to or embedded YouTube / Vimeo content.

  • @numericcitizen I'm guessing that they ran the numbers on how many customers they're likely to have, and how many more might be out their given Apple's plans to shift over completely to their own silicon, and decided the projected sales didn't justify the expense.

  • @numericcitizen This is a problem with all apps that are overlays on a service that is also a website. Their design is rarely about giving the user more control, and a lot more about giving the service more control over the user. (Micro.blog is a notable exception to this.)

  • @ReaderJohn My dad had several of Gore Vidal's books in his collection, I should go read them sometime.

  • @mandaris I think Thriller definitely overshadows Off The Wall, particularly in the number of songs that subsequently became hit singles, plus of course That Video for the title track. But now that I've actually heard more track from Off The Wall I share your sentiment, both Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones were at the top of their game and it shows. That's not a knock on Thriller, but the latter had to live up to its own hype.

  • @adders I don't blame you for feeling nervous, I'd be the same. Precaution is still the operative word, no matter what others may think.

  • @artkavanagh Occasionally I'll get a link from someone that is a Google Docs form, so I'll open that in Safari instead. Other than that, no problems so far.

  • @artkavanagh Google's search results don't give you the direct URLs, but instead use ones that redirect through Google, so perhaps that does something to the browser history? I was able to reproduce what you saw in Safari on my Mac, but in Vivaldi (where I have Google cookies blocked) that doesn't occur and I see the Google results page in my browser history.

    (These days I use Safari for the occasional access to those few Google services I still make use of, like Drive.)

  • @rishabh I'll be honest, I do sometimes wonder if my Mac has been improved by (eventually) upgrading from Mojave to Catalina and now Big Sur. Most of the changes appear to be more for Apple's supposed benefit than mine.

  • @sander I have a niggling feeling I might have tried it out back when it first launched, in the heady days when Google Reader was still a thing. And if I'm honest I'd rather have a design that gets things done than one that looks pretty but makes things more convoluted than they need to be.

  • @sander Looks interesting, definitely something I'd try out now that I'm not using Inoreader.

  • @gr36 I've adopted the policy of presuming that all companies are looking out for themselves, not me, and proceeding accordingly. Sadly, tribalism is a useful force that companies can harness to deflect criticism and hamper critics. It predates social networks, and to so extent the internet too.

  • @terrygrier What I find maddening about this situation is that earlier versions of iTunes, back when I owned an iPod, stood out as really good music managers. Then, as Apple shoved additional stuff into it, things deteriorated, and that continued even as the company subsequently pulled that additional stuff back out again. On top of that, they seem to have gone out of their way to stop users from easily synching music to their other devices. It's a crying shame.

  • @jean I had to go to Wikipedia to remind myself about ImageReady, it was around for longer than I remember.

  • @amit I read that a few days ago, and it turns out I didn't even know half of the products mentioned. Which probably speaks volumes about Google.

  • @johnjohnston I used Fireworks a LOT back in the 2000s when it was still a Macromedia product, for designing front-ends for CDs and DVDs that I was putting together for clients. But once I left full-time employment in 2012 that need diminished dramatically, and then Adobe announced that it would no longer be developed and it was relegated to the background of Creative Cloud. I'm surprised that it kept going this long.

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